sugar-freeSoda is hugely popular and many people are addicted to its sweet taste and fizzy texture. It’s a big source of calories from refined sugar in the form of high fructose corn syrup. Diet sodas, which have artificial sweeteners instead of sugar, are said to lessen the health effects of regular soda but research has shown that’s not the case. [1] Diet sodas, typically sweetened with aspartame, are linked to increased obesity and other problems. Now, to avoid that negative spotlight, Pepsi has announced they’ll replace aspartame with sucralose (Splenda), citing consumer demand. [2]

Is Sucralose Any Better?

While sucralose starts with sugar, it goes through an unnatural process to make it free from calories and 300 to 1,000 times as sweet as pure table sugar. Simply swapping out one artificial sweetener for another one isn’t the answer because even sucralose has a host of negative health effects associated with its consumption[3]

The Best Alternatives to Artificial Sweeteners

No amount of refined sugar is good for you and artificial sweeteners are even worse. Stevia might be the natural alternative to artificial sweeteners as the natural green powdered leaf is probably the least processed form of the plant you can get, but it’s not ideal. And really, why do you need to drink this anyway? Water with a little lemon juice or ACV is a much better option and supports your health.

What do you think?
Global Healing Center® is a leading natural health provider offering natural and organic supplements, cleanses, and a wealth of free natural health articles.

by Dr. Edward Group DC, NP, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM

Source: Pepsi Swaps Aspartame for Sucralose: Is It Worth It?

References (3)
  1. Qing Yang. Gain weight by “going diet?” Artificial sweeteners and the neurobiology of sugar cravings. Yale J Biol Med. 2010 Jun; 83(2): 101-108.
  2. Jackie Wattles. Diet Pepsi replaces aspartame with… CNN Money.
  3. Schiffman SS, Rother KI. Sucralose, a synthetic organochlorine sweetener: overview of biological issues. J Toxicol Environ Health B Crit Rev. 2013;16(7):399-451. doi: 10.1080/10937404.2013.842523.

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