sunlightVitamin D is an essential part of a healthy diet. The human body needs relatively large quantities of it in order to maintain bone density and metabolism, as well as general organ health.

The impact it has on the body’s overall well-being cannot be overstated. Over time, vitamin D deficiency doesn’t just weaken bones, it has also been shown to impede nerve function and mental cognition. It’s also important for maintaining a healthy heart and immune system.

Unfortunately, very few of us get the necessary amount of Vitamin D our bodies require. In fact, estimates are that over two-thirds of the the U.S. and European population is vitamin D deficient. And the figures are even worse in many other parts of the world.

How Much Vitamin D Does My Body Need?

The previous RDA recommendation is that adults up to age 50 consume at least 200 international units (IUs) each day. This number increases to 400 IU for adults between the ages of 51 and 70, and 600 IU for adults who are over age 70. However, these amounts changed in late 2010, when the Institute of Medicine released new recommended Vitamin D intakes. They recommend that healthy adults get 600 IU per day, and adults over the age of 71 should get 800 IU per day.
Suntrex D3™ is a natural vitamin D3 supplement formula that boosts the immune system, assists with calcium absorption, promotes brain health, and more.
Despite these new recommended amounts, many experts now believe, myself included, that the current recommendations are grossly inadequate.

In fact, according to Dr. Anthony Norman, professor of biochemistry and biomedical sciences at the University of California, Riverside, and world renowned expert of vitamin D, the average adult should intake between 2,000 and 4,000 IU per day to maintain proper health [1].

If these new estimates are correct, then the average person isn’t just slightly lacking in vitamin D – They are severely deficient!

Not only that, but it also means that many of us who believe we are already getting enough are sorely mistaken. To further underscore the benefits of providing the body with sufficient levels of Vitamin D, Dr. Norman adds that that a number of studies indicate noticeable “reductions in incidence of breast cancer, colon cancer and type 1 diabetes in association with adequate intake of vitamin D, the positive effect generally occurring within five years of initiation of adequate vitamin D intake.”

Natural Sources of Vitamin D

shiitake_mushroomsExposure to amounts of ultraviolet radiation from sunshine especially at sunrise and sunset, or artificial substitutes such as tanning or UV beds, trigger the human body’s natural ability to produce vitamin D. Other naturally occurring sources are somewhat scarce. Only a handful of foods are known to contain measurable quantities of vitamin D. These food sources primarily include different varieties of fish and fish oil.

However, as a vegetarian, I do not eat or recommend eating fish. My personal favorite is Shiitake mushrooms, as they are very high in vitamin d, as well as vitamins B1 and B2. Many fortified cereals and other grain products also contain a fair amount of D vitamins. Organic eggs are also high in vitamin D.

Is There A Better Way to Get More Vitamin D?

Considering the difficulties nearly all of us have getting even the current daily requirement, taking a vitamin D3 supplement like Suntrex D3 is a great way to conveniently fill the gap.

Suntrex D3 is a unique live source of D vitamin that more than meets the human body’s dietary needs and it is 100% vegetarian. Because it’s a liquid and not a pill or capsule, it does not contain any unnecessary fillers or binding agents.

by Dr. Edward Group DC, NP, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM

Source: Expert: 50% of the World’s Population Deficient in Vitamin D

 

References (1)
  1. University of California Riverside. More than half the world’s population gets insufficient vitamin D, says biochemist. ScienceDaily. 2010 July 19.

 

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