cellphoneradiationRadiation is all around us. Power lines, appliances, and electronic devices all emit electromagnetic frequencies. One source that many of us keep close, perhaps too close, are cell phones, tablets, and other mobile devices. They all use radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic energy, a form of non-ionizing radiation, to communicate. Research has shown that this type of radiation is not benign or harmless to the human body, especially childrenExposure to cell phone and Wifi radiation has been linked to fatigue, dizziness, mental fog, and even worse. As a result, the demand for products that reduce exposure to device radiation is on the rise. In fact, “How can I protect myself from cell phone radiation? What do you recommend?” is a question we get all the time. So, to help, I wanted to offer my thoughts on five products I’ve found that I believe are worth a look if you’re interested in reducing your exposure to cell phone and mobile device radiation.

1. Pong Case by Pong Research – $70-$130

The Pong Case is easy to use and snaps on to activate two built in antenna that draw away radiation. Tests performed by Pong labs and Wired magazine show that Pong cases redirect energy from the face of the cell phone or tablet toward the back of the device, reducing absorption by 67%. While one might think this would interrupt reception, the opposite occurs and reception has actually been observed to increase up to 13%. It fits most major phone brands and Pong also makes a case for the iPad (however it works a little differently and diffuses the energy instead of redirecting). The products come with a 6 month warranty and a 60 day money back guarantee. For more information, visit their website or watch these videos.

2. LifeWave Matrix 2 – $50

The LifeWave Matrix 2 looks like a mini credit card and is secured to the back of the phone. Independent tests have used radiation meters to show that this composite slip with coil technology reduces RF radiation by 98%. It’s available in multiple sizes and there’s likely one available for your cell phone. For more information, visit their website or watch the following video. You can also check out this detailed test report.

3. Bodywell Chip – $30

This SIM-style card is a little larger in size and attaches to the inside of the battery case with a quick peel and stick. Research shows the Bodywell reduces radiation by 65% on the iPhone 5, 80% on the Samsung Galaxy S3, and 35% on an iPad. This card could probably be used on smaller laptops, too. It’s 30 day money back guarantee also makes it worth a look. For more information visit their website or view the reports for the iPhone 5Samsung Galaxy SIII, and iPad. You can also watch this video.

4. BlocSock by Block Radiation LTD – $25

The BlocSock is a small, 3”x5½”, lightweight case that’s only designed for cell phones, not tablets or laptops. One side is a normal fabric to ensure reception. The other side has a rectangular, metallic mesh to shield RF radiation. It’s recommended that you keep the side with the shielding material between the phone and your body. When making or receiving calls, keep the shielding between your head and the phone. It can also be moved into a smaller “kangaroo style” pouch during calls. It’s effective, and tests show that it reduces RF exposure 96%. For more information, check out the SAR research test or watch this video.

5. CellSafe Radicushion – $45-$80

The ultra thin (1mm) RadiCushion by Cellsafe slips into the cell phone case and redirects radiation away from the face of the phone. It’s available in black or white but not recommended for use with aluminum or metallic cell phone cases. Test results show a SAR reduction of 96%. A slightly thicker (2mm) RadiCushion is available for iPad and iPad mini; it adheres to the back of the device and also provides SAR reductions of 96%. Visit their website for more information or watch this independent test which shows an 80% reduction and also compares it to the BlocSock:

6. Antenna Search – Free!

Okay, so Antenna Search isn’t really a device but it is a handy service that will tell you how close you are to cellular towers. I punched in my address and found there are SEVENTY-TWO cellular towers and antennas within a 4 mile radius. It lists all the details for each tower — owner, coordinates, installation date, etc. It’s a really useful tool for finding out the surrounding risks.

7. SYB Pocket Patch

How many times do you put your cell phone in your back pocket when dashing to work or to a meeting? Maintaining a close proximity of cell phones to reproductive organs may not be the wisest idea when it comes to protecting reproductive health. SYB (Shield Your Body) Pocket Patch is a thin, white, and extremely lightweight patch that can be easily ironed on to the inside of pockets, effectively reducing up to 99% of cell phone radiation. Despite the powerful radiation-blocking effects of the hypoallergenic patch, it doesn’t interfere with your phone’s battery life or its normal behavior. It can be easily ironed on to any fabric, and tests show that the SYB maintains its potency even after 30 washes. Each patch is 5.5″ tall and 3.75″ wide, perfect for basic pockets in most pants, sweaters, and jackets.

Final Thoughts

Have you used these, or other, devices to protect yourself from radiation? Please leave a comment below and share your experience! And, if you haven’t yet seen it, check out this article where I look at products that can help protect you from laptop radiation.

by Dr. Edward Group DC, NP, DACBN, DCBCN, DABFM

Source: How to Protect Yourself from Dangerous Cell Phone Radiation

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